Deaerator Design and Operation

  • 12 February 2019
  • Author: Chem-Aqua, Inc
  • Number of views: 441
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Deaerator Design and Operation

A deaerator preheats boiler feedwater and removes dissolved gases, especially oxygen and carbon dioxide. These gases are undesirable because they cause corrosion and increase treatment chemical requirements. 

Deaerators operate based on the reduced solubility of dissolved gases as temperature increases. For example, the solubility of oxygen decreases from about five ppm at 150oF to about two ppm at 190oF. Virtually all the free carbon dioxide gas is removed by increasing the temperature to greater than 170oF.

How to Prepare Your Boiler for an Inspection

A Step-by-Step Guide

  • 6 November 2018
  • Author: Chem-Aqua, Inc
  • Number of views: 474
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How to Prepare Your Boiler for an Inspection

Periodic boiler inspections are necessary to ensure that all equipment and components are operating safely and properly. When removing a boiler from service, the proper procedures should be used to reduce thermal stress and prevent sludge from settling and “baking on” waterside surfaces.

If a boiler is cooled too rapidly or unevenly, the extreme expansion and contraction stress can cause leaks to develop on rolled tube ends as well as damage firebrick or refractory material. Rapid cooling and draining can also cause any suspended solids in the boiler water to form hard, difficult-to-remove deposits. These deposits not only reduce heat transfer efficiency but could also lead to a false interpretation of the treatment program results.

How Reverse Osmosis Works

From Design to Cleaning

  • 18 October 2018
  • Author: Chem-Aqua, Inc
  • Number of views: 993
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How Reverse Osmosis Works

Reverse osmosis (RO) produces high-purity water for use in many applications, including low and high pressure boilers, manufacturing processes, cleaning, and ultrapure water systems.  RO offers numerous benefits that can save water, fuel, operating costs, labor, and more.  Understanding how it works will help in the selection, maintenance, and operation of RO systems.

The Effects of Carryover in Steam Boiler Systems

The More You Know

  • 14 August 2018
  • Author: Chem-Aqua, Inc
  • Number of views: 2216
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The Effects of Carryover in Steam Boiler Systems

Carryover is any contaminant that leaves the boiler with steam. It can be in a solid, liquid, or vapor form. The most common form of carryover is boiler water droplets that contain dissolved and suspended solids.

Boiler water carryover can cause deposits to form in valves, heat exchangers, turbines, and superheaters. If deposits are significant, heat transfer and/or turbine efficiency may be reduced. Additionally, carryover can strip away the protective magnetic layer on steam lines, remove the film formed by filming amine programs, cause erosion-induced corrosion, and result in product quality problems in processes using live steam.

The Value of Good Boiler Blowdown Control

A Critical Component of the Boiler Water Treatment Program

The Value of Good Boiler Blowdown Control

In a steam boiler system, blowdown involves removing a portion of the concentrated boiler water and replacing it with feedwater, which is a mixture of condensate and makeup water.

Good blowdown control is a critical component of the boiler water treatment program.  Boiler blowdown is heated, treated feedwater that is sent to the drain instead of converted into steam. Blowdown is used to control the dissolved and suspended solids level in a boiler within the range necessary to minimize scale deposits and carryover.  Too much blowdown increases fuel, water, and treatment requirements.  Too little blowdown can cause scale deposits and wet steam (carryover)

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