Where Should I Sample for Legionella?

Where Should I Sample for Legionella?

Should your Water Management Plan (WMP) Program Team decide to utilize environmental water sampling to validate the effectiveness of the WMP, ANSI/ASHRAE 188-2018 advises that these tests should be performed by a laboratory accredited to a nationally or internationally recognized standard (e.g., ISO/IEC 17025:2017), with Legionellaa included in the laboratory’s scope of accreditation.

Before environmental sampling is undertaken, a Sampling Plan should be formulated.  This plan should list the devices and Points of Use (POUs) to be sampled, at what frequency sampling will be performed, what the acceptable control limits will be, and what the response protocol will be for any sample result(s) falling outside of the previously-established control limits. 

Legionella: To Sample, or Not To Sample?...That is the Question

What's required and what is my sampling plan?

  • 9 juillet 2019
  • Author: Dominick Tuzzo
  • Number of views: 1784
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Legionella: To Sample, or Not To Sample?...That is the Question

The simple answer is no (not directly), and here’s why:  There is no known safe level of Legionella in a building water system.  Therefore, even a non-detect sample result is not necessarily “safe.” The reason why is because the life cycle of this organism, coupled with the stresses put on it via temperature, disinfectants, etc. found within building water systems, may cause it to enter a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state. 

Chlorine and Bromine Testing In Cooling Tower Systems

What You Need to Know

  • 25 juin 2019
  • Author: Allan Browning
  • Number of views: 5748
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Chlorine and Bromine Testing In Cooling Tower Systems

Chlorine and bromine based biocides are widely used for microbiological control in cooling tower systems. These halogen compounds form strong oxidizing agents in water, which is how they kill bacteria and other microorganisms. Routine testing is important to confirm effective halogen residuals are maintained. Low residuals can result in poor microbiological control. High residuals can cause corrosion and destroy inhibitors.

How Often Should I Test My Water?

  • 7 mai 2019
  • Author: Tim Daniels
  • Number of views: 2535
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How Often Should I Test My Water?

Chem-Aqua representatives are frequently asked, “How often do I need to test my water?”  The answer to this question is as varied as the systems that Chem-Aqua treats.  There are a number of factors that go into determining the “best practice” for each facility.  Typically, these factors are:

Dip Slides vs. Lab Testing

The Key Differences and Similarities

Dip Slides vs. Lab Testing

Monitoring bacteria levels in cooling water systems is vital to the operating life, efficiency, and functionality of a well-run system.  Unmonitored microbiological activity can lead to deposits, corrosion, blockages, downtime, increased energy usage, and possibly even disease.  There are many variables in field versus laboratory bacteria testing that need to be considered in order to take the proper course of action when required.  While differences are expected between these two testing methods, both offer various advantages.  Ultimately, trends over time and after specific events offer the most clarity.

Whether testing in a lab or in the field, results from microbiological water analysis must be dependable and accurate to maintain proper system control. A highly trained Chem-Aqua water treatment professional can help to maintain the right system chemistry to ensure that a facility’s systems remain optimal and compliant. Check out this infographic to learn more about the differences between field and lab testing.

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